16th - 18th October 2018
Krakow, Poland


Organised by info@tdnuk.com +44 (0) 1245 407 916

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Combat Engineer Main 2-Day Conference Agenda

The scale of investment in European defence from NATO partners and the European Union requires the continued development of military engineer capabilities. Whether it be achieving freedom of movement, developing new area denial and anti-access systems, building self-sustaining tactical bases or researching innovative gap crossing systems, military engineer capabilities remain a significant area of investment.

Combat Engineer 2018 will explore how modern military engineer capability can be improved to support NATO’s Enhanced Forward Presence, plans and deployments, NATO response forces and the Connected Forces Initiative. The conference provides a unique opportunity for military engineers and industry to showcase and discuss the latest developments in capability requirements and industry solutions.

The Combat Engineer 2018 conference will be chaired by Major General Robert Talbot Rice, Former Director of the UK MoD's Land Equipment Procurement


ENHANCING MOBILITY FOR MODERN OPERATIONS

Military forces require the ability to move rapidly and freely in the area of operations in order to fulfil their primary mission. Mobility is necessary to achieve concentration of effort and rapidly to engage or to disengage the enemy. Superior mobility may compensate for numerical inferiority and is affected by terrain, weather and enemy activity. This section of the agenda will be exploring modern operations and how military engineering has led to their success.


DENYING THE ENEMY MANOEUVRABILITY

Counter-mobility operations affect an enemy’s ability to manoeuvre freely and selectively deny him the use of terrain. They may also reduce the effect of an attacker’s superiority in numbers, and channel him into areas of our choosing where he can be defeated. Counter-mobility planning must also take account of own-force manoeuvre requirements.


COMBAT ENGINEERING IN URBAN ENVIRONMENTS

Increased use of the urban environment will present a range of new threats and opportunities for a determined enemy. It will require the development of bespoke engineer vehicles and solutions to deal effectively with this potential threat to friendly forces. Due to the complexity of the battle, land forces engineers have a major and decisive part to play. This session will investigate and analyse urban engineering and the challenges faced.


ENGINEERING IN COLD WEATHER CONDITIONS

Forces operating under cold weather conditions must be capable of performing all types of operations, although it should be understood that the execution of these will be exceptionally difficult and be more time-consuming. The critical aspect of operations in extreme cold conditions is that the survival of the force may be a more difficult problem than dealing with the enemy. Success will depend on the training, equipment and acclimatisation of forces.


BASE PROTECTION ON OPERATIONS

Effective base protection does not rely on a single technique or action but comes from a combination of measures both procedural and physical that seek to deter or mitigate the effects of an attack. The fortification of operational bases is a key consideration in both urban and rural operating areas and the latest innovations in base protection and perimeter security remain high on military agendas.


EFFECTIVE UNDERSTANDING AND INTELLIGENCE FOR EXPLOSIVES

The nature and character of warfare will continue to change, and evolve, becoming more complex and asymmetric. Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) can be simple to design and easy to make, and they can also be sophisticated with the incorporation of modern electronic components which are both inexpensive and widely available. There is a clear need not only to understand the characteristics of IEDs, but also how to interdict an adversary’s IED system.


AUTONOMY IN THE ENGINEERING ROLE

Autonomy is slowly being integrated into modern militaries and the engineering corps is no exception, with tasks such as EOD removal already having some tasks being conducted by autonomous equipment. This section sets out to look at future military technology and the role autonomy will play in this, finishing with a panel discussion.